onegoodman

rnode-npntoaai:

Modern Le Mans endurance prototype cars are the most highly advanced racing cars in the world. The technology developed on the track is crucial to the everyday road car, and the length of an endurance race (6 to 24 hours) is the ultimate test for any new technology. These cars must be fast, but most of all they must be safe — for both the driver and the spectators. The main safety feature is the carbon-fibre composite aluminium honeycomb monocoque. Think of the monocoque as a bomb shelter for one. When a car crashes, the monocoque must remain in one piece, regardless the severity of the crash. Parts outside of the monocoque are wired so they remain connected to the car, even when broken. This ensures no large part of the car goes flying into the audience.

The last two photos are from a massive wreck during the 2011 24 Hours of Le Mans. Driver Allan McNish was unharmed. Decades ago, a crash like this would have resulted in a fatality.

mcostaphoto
mcostaphoto:

I had the absolute pleasure of meeting and spending a majority of the weekend with this man. In the 1970’s, Ted Simon, a journalist from London, rode his motorcycle around the world. Four years and 45 countries later, he completed his journey. Then, 13 years ago at the age of 69, he did it again. 
He is truly an inspiring man, and everybody could learn something from him. I really hope our path’s cross again. 
"What point, then, in worrying about the stars. It was enough to know they were there and that I was heading for them. I thought myself to be the most fortunate man alive to have the whole world almost literally within my grasp. There was no one on earth I would have changed places with." 
"Within minutes the great void inside me was filled by a rush of exaltation, and in my solitary madness I started to sing." 
"What happened on the way, who I met, all that was incidental. I had not quite realized yet that the interruptions were the journey."
-Jupiter’s Travels, Ted Simon

mcostaphoto:

I had the absolute pleasure of meeting and spending a majority of the weekend with this man. In the 1970’s, Ted Simon, a journalist from London, rode his motorcycle around the world. Four years and 45 countries later, he completed his journey. Then, 13 years ago at the age of 69, he did it again. 

He is truly an inspiring man, and everybody could learn something from him. I really hope our path’s cross again. 

"What point, then, in worrying about the stars. It was enough to know they were there and that I was heading for them. I thought myself to be the most fortunate man alive to have the whole world almost literally within my grasp. There was no one on earth I would have changed places with." 

"Within minutes the great void inside me was filled by a rush of exaltation, and in my solitary madness I started to sing." 

"What happened on the way, who I met, all that was incidental. I had not quite realized yet that the interruptions were the journey."

-Jupiter’s Travels, Ted Simon